The Tidal Bore in Moncton and Riverview

By DAMI - Last updated: Wednesday, February 27, 2013 - Save & Share - Leave a Comment
The Tidal Bore flows up the Peticodiac River through Riverview. Moncton can be seen in the distance.

The Tidal Bore flows up the Peticodiac River through Riverview. Moncton can be seen in the distance.

The tides in the Bay of Fundy are the highest in the world. The Peticodiac River that passes through Dieppe, Moncton and Riverview gets tidal waters that flow in through Chignecto Bay and Shepody Bay. As the high tides enter from The Bay of Fundy the create a tidal bore; a wave of water that pushes up stream.

The Peticodiac fills and empties twice per day. At the lowest tide the muddy chocolate brown banks are exposed and at the highest level the water covers most all of the banks and raises up the level of the flat grassy flats that surround the river.

There are a few small branches that break off the main river and create interesting valleys and canyons!

There are a few small branches that break off the main river and create interesting valleys and canyons!

There are super viewing spots in Moncton, there is an outdoor amphitheater type of seating near for visitors to watch the daily event. Of course every day the tides are at different times and sometimes the tidal bore is at night. There is a clock on Main Street that shows when the bore will pass.

We usually watch from Riverview along Riverfront Park or on the trail that runs to Dieppe. The river is always changing and that is what makes it so neat!

When the moon is full the tidal bore is usually really big with so much force, and when it is calm and mid month sometimes it is almost difficult to perceive the waters flowing in.

Every season is different as well, in Winter the ice freezes in the brown muddy waters and the width of the river becomes narrower as huge shelves of ice are created.

As the river rises and falls twice a day it creates strange sculptures, caves, pillars and formations that will, in Spring, collapse and melt away and the river will again to her full width.

In Winter, the flowing Peticodiac creates amazing circular ice floes that contrast with the chocolate brown river water.

In Winter, the flowing Peticodiac creates amazing circular ice floes that contrast with the chocolate brown river water.

When it is very cold the surface gets iced over and circular islands of ice come swirling up and down the river. In Winter, the flowing Peticodiac creates amazing circular ice floes that contrast with the chocolate brown river water.

Sometimes parts of the river are frozen solid with an icy slush that sits motionless while the water flows beneath and as the tides retreat the ice slowly starts scraping along the edges creating a sound like sand or gravel being poured into a hole.

In the summer the waters dance and sparkle like diamonds in the sunshine and gulls swoop and cry overhead. Herons often stroll along the banks and there is a good chance you will see an Eagle up high and a Stoat down low and maybe the Fox who lives in the safe fields nearby.

There are ducks and geese who ride the incoming and outgoing waters. We have seen a dolphin in the Peticodiac three times in the short while we’ve lived here!

The river is always changing and moving, rising and falling and it is a beautiful symbol for the constant changes that occur in life and nature.

A pair of Canada Geese slide in for a perfect landing on the Peticodiac River in New Brunswick.

A pair of Canada Geese slide in for a perfect landing on the Peticodiac River in New Brunswick.

Posted in Uncategorized • Tags: , , , , Top Of Page

Write a comment